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Laura Bartusiak
Woodlands Academy

Super Bowl Sunday is the most important holiday in America. Most people celebrate it with drinks, food, friends and a party.

My family does that, of course, but we like to add something unique to our celebration: Super Bowl Sunday Bingo. Here’s how it works: My dad makes a bingo board that pertains to the game. Examples of spaces are “fumble in the second quarter,” “Doritos commercial” and “the coach gets Gatorade poured on his head.”

It’s my favorite way to celebrate the Super Bowl. Every year I look forward to my father’s bingo game and playing with my family. If the team I like doesn’t make it to the Super Bowl (unfortunately the Patriots aren’t playing this year), then I always have the bingo game to look forward to. I think what makes the Super Bowl so much fun are the individual ways families celebrate it.

Game of the Week

Boys basketball: St. Ignatius at Loyola
7 p.m. Friday

It’s Jesuit school against Jesuit school. Loyola (15-4) has improved greatly since last year’s 9-18 finish. St. Ignatius (13-6) was co-champion of the Catholic League last year. North Chicago basketball coach Gerald Coleman told the Tribune last week, “Like I told my guys, (St. Ignatius is) very patient, very well-coached.”

Other games to watch
Boys basketball: Notre Dame at Carmel, 7:30 p.m. Friday

Girls basketball: Taft at Whitney Young, 6 p.m. Wednesday.

Quotable
Kobe Bryant finally joined Twitter on Jan. 4. This was his first tweet, getting many retweets, even from celebrities such as Joseph Gordon-Levitt and Megan Fox:

“The antisocial has become social #mambatweets”

Just Saying
Sammy Sosa, just because you “retired” doesn’t mean you’re going to make it into the Hall of Fame. I’m pretty sure you need to have talent for that. … Chicago Bulls, you’re worth $800 million. Can you please start playing like it? … The Bears have a new coach and now they’re trying to redo the offensive line. Hopefully this means it will actually be good next year.

English football
I’m spending two weeks in England on exchange and I’ve noticed one thing so far: The English love soccer. It’s the topic of their conversations 24/7; the sport everyone plays and dreams of playing on a professional level, and they even pay attention to teams in other countries, such as the U.S. I’m pretty sure they know more about what’s happening in American soccer than I do. Also, David Beckham is their idol and they really look up to him in multiple ways. If the English have taught me one thing about sports it’s this: Don’t concentrate only on the team from your state or even your country, and “soccer” is the incorrect term. It’s “football.”

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About The Mash

Maura Wall Hernandez is digital editor of The Mash.

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